Action Needed Now : Your support will make a difference. Please help the people of South Sudan

  • Famine was declared in South Sudan a year ago
  • Two-thirds of the population – 7.1 million people – could be at risk of starvation by May 2018 if humanitarian assistance isn’t provided.
  • This crisis has been caused by the ongoing conflict and the displacement of 4 million people - 1 in 3 of the country’s population and nearly 2.5 million South Sudanese have fled the country
  • Over the last year World Vision provided life saving assistance to more than 1.5 million people. When famine was declared last February, a joint interagency response was able to help scale back the severity of the disaster.
  • But much more needs to be done.
  • Your Support WILL make a difference. Please Help the People of South Sudan.




RTE News reporter Ray Kennedy visited South Sudan with World Vision this week.
Watch his reports on the crisis here:

 


Working in South Sudan since 1989

World Vision International has been working in South Sudan since 1989 and was one of the few aid agencies that provided emergency assistance during war to the displaced populations in what was then the Southern Sudan region of Sudan. After the country became independent in 2011, World Vision began recovery and development activities.


Aid rapidly needs to reach hundreds of thousands of men, women and children who risk starvation in South Sudan following the declaration of famine, warns World Vision.

7.1 million people could be at risk of starvation by May 2018 if humanitarian assistance isn’t provided, putting the lives of tens of thousands of children in danger. The famine declaration has been caused by a combination of conflict and drought but the numbers already impacted are worse than predicted just a few weeks ago.

Perry Mansfield, National Director for World Vision in South Sudan said: “The situation facing children who were already hungry and going without meals is now rapidly unravelling. If aid funding and deliveries are not immediately scaled up we should expect to see children facing a catastrophe. Starvation and migration in order to find food will take place on a massive scale.”

South Sudanese History:

South Sudan is the world’s newest country, achieving independence in 2011 after it was annexed from Sudan. This occurred after 20 years of civil war between north and south Sudan during which over two million people were killed.

A fresh conflict started in December 2013 which has led to 1.6 million people fleeing their homes. Many are left without adequate shelter, food, water, or sanitation and hygiene facilities. A peace agreement was signed in August 2015 by the leaders of the two conflicting parties. This has led to the formation of a Transitional Government of National Unity. Tensions between the parties has led to an escalation of violence in Juba in July 2016, causing the displacement of an additional 36,000 people in the immediate aftermath, destruction and looting of homes and markets, and hyperinflation of over 650%. In September 2016, South Sudan passed the one million mark of officially registered refugees in neighbouring countries. The actual number is very likely to be much higher. South Sudan’s economy has been highly dependent on oil production. With decreasing oil prices, severely reduced production due to recurring fighting in the oil-rich areas and high fees for use of foreign pipelines and refineries, the country’s income has been severely reduced. Access to land and water near oilfields is also causing further tensions, between conflicting parties at national level as well as between communities.

Very limited state infrastructure, vulnerability to climate shocks and internal migration resulted in up to 4.4 million people needing humanitarian aid in 2014 and 4.1 million in 2015.Female rights are neglected, with primary school completion rates for girls at only 6%, half that of boys. Overall, 59% of children are not attending school, adult illiteracy is reported to be as high as 73% overall, and 90% for women in rural areas.